Media

Physical Health Declination and Its Connection to Homelessness

When facing homelessness, all aspects of one’s life are affected. While the mental health of those experiencing homelessness is fairly talked about, physical health isn’t discussed as much. Physical health affects many aspects of someone’s life, especially being able to attend work. With physical health complications come expenses. But, dealing with physical health issues and facing homelessness makes life significantly more difficult. 

All illnesses can be classified as long or short-term. Everyone faces physical health complications in their life, whether it be the flu or a chronic illness. When one is homeless, however, even the common cold can make life exponentially worse. 

Say you think of a disease that is easily treatable for someone who isn’t facing homelessness and has access to all things necessary: a  job, reliable income, health insurance, and doctors. An example of this is diabetes. 

Diabetes can be manageable if you have the proper resources. That way, you can go about your day-to-day activities. If an individual experiencing homeless has diabetes, they lack the necessary resources to make the disease manageable.  

No matter the physical complication, being short of resources can affect an individual long-term. If someone is unable to access necessary medical resources and treatment, they can face many health complications.  

When  faced with homelessness, disabilities worsen, and the odds of an individual using alcohol and drugs to cope increases.

Those experiencing homelessness may experience dental problems, malnutrition, hepatitis, joint disease, parasitic infestations, etc. When not being able to have necessities that keep an individual healthy/clean, the skin can develop disorders or illnesses. Which then, when left untreated, will worsen. 

When it comes to enduring homelessness, individuals could get beaten, hurt, attacked, etc. If injured, these individuals will require medical attention, depending on the brutality, to ensure that their injuries don’t worsen. 

Sources:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK218236/

Scroll to Top